• News

Ferdinand Marcos Buried at Libingan ng mga Bayani

marcos-burial2

The late former President Ferdinand Marcos, otherwise known as “The Dictator” was finally sent to a hurried burial at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (Heroes’ Cemetery), Friday, November 18, 2016. The event took place after the current Philippine President “Digong” Duterte granted the Marcoses’ appeal of finally sending the former president’s remains to eternal peace.

The ceremony was closed to public. According to ABS-CBN News, soldiers carried Ferdinand Marcos’ wooden black casket. During the march, his wife, Emelda Marcos was holding a rosary together with their children who were all wearing white. His only living sister, Fortuna Marcos-Barba who was on a wheel-chair, was also present.

It is remembered that the late Ferdinand Marcos died during his exile in Hawaii in 1989. That was three years after historical EDSA revolution. His remains were sent back to the Philippines in 1993 and was preserved and kept at Ilocos Norte, his home town.

Photo Credits to: Inquirer News

Photo Credits to: Inquirer News

The burial set quite a fire of reactions from people around the country. People have different opinions regarding Ferdinand Marcos’ worth to be recognized as a Filipino hero.  Prior to the burial, human rights victims of Ferdinand Marcos’ dictatorship filed petition against the said burial. The petitioners disagreed on the idea of burying Ferdinand Marcos together with the other Presidents of the Republic, soldiers, war veterans, and artists who are all recognized as heroes of the country. However, the Supreme Court (SC) has rejected all 8 petitions.

People, young and old, have different perceptions on such historical issue. Most expressed their insights on social media, while others gathered in a rally, reminisced history and spoke their disagreement. However, what already happened has happened and the burial of the former president who became a dictator, Ferdinand Marcos, is another mark of the history that the next generations will read in books, and talk about during class discussions.

Please share your comments

You may also like...